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Military Eye Trauma Statistics

  • Eye injury rates, both noncombat-related and combat-related, among active duty U.S. Army personnel increased between 1996 and 2005. (Hilber D, Mitchener TA, Stout J, Hatch B, Canham-Chervak M. Eye injury surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense, 1996-2005. Am J Prev Med. 2010;38(1S):S78-S85)
  • From 2000 through 2010, there were 186,555 eye injuries worldwide in military medical facilities. (Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Eye Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2010. MSMR. 2011;18(5):2-7)
  • The rate of injury for women was consistently higher than for men by approximately seven to 21 percent. Between 2002 and 2005, injury rates were greatest for Individuals age ≥40 years. The most significant factors leading to hospitalization were ordnance handling (16.9 percent), enemy action (13.1 percent), and assaults and fighting (11.9 percent). (Hilber D, Mitchener TA, Stout J, Hatch B, Canham-Chervak M. Eye injury surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense, 1996-2005. Am J Prev Med. 2010;38(1S):S78-S85)
  • The average Army eye injury results in a loss of 6.1 days from work and costs $9,724. The Navy loses an average of 5.9 work days at a cost of $4,222 for each individual injury. The Air Force loses 4.7 days of work at a cost of $3,196 per individual injury. (Buckingham RS, Whitwell KJ, Lee RB. Cost analysis of military eye injuries in fiscal years 1988-1998. Mil Med. 2005; 170: (3)196-200)
  • Training, education, and the use of appropriate eye protection will help to reduce eye injury rates.