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Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

Mosquito-borne illness is a significant public health concern, both to the Department of Defense (DOD) and to the broader national and international public health community. Here, we provide a collection of resources to assist in education and risk communication for partners and stakeholders on issues relating to mosquito control and prevention, as well as the prevention of mosquito-borne infectious disease.

Mosquito-Borne Illnesses A-Z

Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illness 

To prevent an outbreak of any mosquito-borne illness, its important to control the mosquito population and protect yourself from mosquito bites. 

  • Use insect repellant
  • Treat your clothing and gear if you'll be outside
  • Mosquito-proof your home

Traveling Overseas? 

Mosquito bites are bothersome enough, but when you consider risks, like getting sick with Zika, dengue, chikungunya or other mosquito-borne illness, its important to protect yourself and your family when traveling overseas. 

Avoid Mosquito Bites

  • Research your travel destination: Learn about country-specific travel advice, health risks, and how to stay safe by visiting CDC Travelers' Health website.
  • Use insect repellent: Use an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
  • Cover up: Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Keep mosquitoes outside: Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your home or hotel, sleep under a mosquito bed net.

After Your Trip

Visit your healthcare provider right away if you develop a fever, headache, rash, muscle or joint pain.

  • Tell your doctor about recent international travel.
  • Visit the CDC's Getting Sick after Travel webpage for more information.

It's Hurricane Season ... Did You Know?

Adult mosquitoes don't usually survive the high winds of a hurricane, but flood waters after the storm will result in large populations of floodwater mosquitoes. These "nuisance" mosquitoes don't typically spread viruses that can make you sick. However, the types of mosquitoes that can spread viruses may increase anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months after a hurricane, especially in areas that didn't flood but received more rainfall than usual. >>Learn More about Mosquitoes & Hurricanes

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Last Updated: July 11, 2023
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